Florida gas jump leads nation

The national average price per gallon set record highs this past week with Florida seeing the largest jump at 29 cents over last week. 

According to the AAA report on Monday, only three states—Georgia, Kansas, and Oklahoma—have yet to cross the $4 per gallon average as the national price shot up to $4.48, including $4.50 in Florida.

The increase comes as crude oil hovers around $110 a barrel. 

“The high cost of oil, the key ingredient in gasoline, is driving these high pump prices for consumers,” AAA spokesperson Andrew Gross said in a statement. “Even the annual seasonal demand dip for gasoline during the lull between spring break and Memorial Day, which would normally help lower prices, is having no effect this year.”

At the Circle K off Newberry Road and NW 75th Street, customers talked about making adjustments in their work and personal lives due to the price increase. 

“I’ve got this V8 [pickup] for work purposes, but I didn’t have the luxury of going to Tallahassee to see my granddaughter’s soccer game this weekend—and she scored two goals,” said Darrell who did not want to disclose his last name and is in currently working in the Gainesville area. “I would have loved to have been there, but in order for me to go, it costs me $120 to fill this tank up. I just can’t afford it. It’s affected my personal life. Work is OK because I get stipends for my gas, but it has made me live my life differently and make some changes.” 

Brad Yanez of Summerfield said he is passing the increased fuel cost on to his customers. 

“I think it’s ridiculous,” Yanez said. “I only drive the truck for work. On the weekends, my wife and I are on bikes. I can fill up both [motorcycle] tanks for $20. But [with the work pickup] I usually go to $60 and stop.” 

Keeuna Campbell of Gainesville said she’s having to rearrange her budget in order to put gas into her jeep. 

“I used to put $60 in my truck and fill it up, but now it only goes to a little over half a tank,” Campbell said. “I’m having to take money out of other stuff. I usually put a certain amount aside for gas every week, but now I’m having to put up more money for gas.” 

AAA shows Florida ranks 19th in the nation for the highest average gas cost at $4.50 per gallon. The state’s record high average of $4.37 came on March 11.

In Gainesville, prices are $4.51 per gallon, up 22 cents from last Monday and 45 cents from last month. Last year the average cost per gallon was $2.92. 

According to GasBuddy.com, the following locations have the best prices in Alachua County:

  • $4.32 at Sam’s Club, 4400 SW 33rd Place, Gainesville
  • $4.38 at Love’s Travel Stop, 5615 SE US 301, Hawthorne
  • $4.39 at Pilot, 17276 US 301, Waldo
  • $4.39 at Circle K, 16130 NW US 441, Gainesville
  • $4.49 at Shell, 13820 NW 140th St., Alachua 
  • $4.49 at Chevron, 7500 W. Newberry Rd., Gainesville
  • $4.49 at Sunoco, 18603 NW County Rd. 236, High Springs
  • $4.49 at Shell, 905 S. Main St., High Springs

Nationally, the average price is at $4.48 per gallon, up from $4.33 last week, $4.08 a month ago and $3.04 a year ago. 

New data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows domestic gasoline stocks decreased by 3.6 million barrels of oil (bbl) to 225 million bbl last week. The gasoline demand decreased slightly from 8.86 million barrels per day (b/d) to 8.7 million b/d. According to the AAA report, lower demand would typically put downward pressure on pump prices, but with crude prices remaining volatile—and as they surge—pump prices will follow suit. 

The seasonal switch to the more expensive summer blend of gasoline, which usually adds seven to 10 cents per gallon depending on the market, is also happening now. This switchover should be complete nationwide by early June. This summer blend switch is an annual event and is unrelated to the Biden Administration’s announcement a few weeks ago to allow the higher ethanol E15 gas blend to remain on sale throughout the summer until September.

Quick Stats

The nation’s top 10 largest weekly increases: Florida (+29 cents), New York (+24 cents), Illinois (+23 cents), Kentucky (+23 cents), New Hampshire (+22 cents), Connecticut (+21 cents), Massachusetts (+20 cents), Ohio (+19 cents), Maine (+19 cents) and Indiana (+19 cents).

The nation’s top 10 most expensive markets: California ($5.98), Hawaii ($5.31), Nevada ($5.17), Washington ($5.03), Oregon ($4.99), Alaska ($4.88), Washington, D.C. ($4.83), Illinois ($4.82), New York ($4.75) and Arizona ($4.75).

National Gas Price Comparison chart 2019-22 5-16-22
National Gas Price Comparison chart 2019-22 5-16-22
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments